House of Incest ebook offer

Cover of Gemor Press edition

Cover of Gemor Press edition

We have spent the last couple weeks celebrating  The Portable Anais Nin, an upcoming entirely new and compelling anthology, by tweeting the entire prose poem House of Incest on Twitter. The process was fascinating because within each phrase there is beauty and hauntingness, not to mention a deep and sometimes disturbing truth. After examining each element of the book, reading the entire interwoven text is mind-blowing, at least in my opinion. To give readers this experience, we are offering the entire ebook free for the next week (until Sept. 17, 2010). To obtain your own copy, visit us on Twitter. If you go back a few tweets, you will find a code, which, when entered on the Smashwords site, will allow you to download the book in any format you wish for nothing. (House of Incest will also be included in The Portable Anais Nin.)

Although the book has been considered unfathomable, even by Henry Miller, it is a matter of letting one’s self go, to submit to the dream, as Nin put it. And as in most dreams, symbolic truths are flavored with their “real” counterparts (or, if you will, manifestations): June Miller (Sabina), D. H. Lawrence (the modern Christ), Louveciennes, the ancient house with a “lost” room, the heavy green gate that symbolized imprisonment, the struggle for freedom, completeness, and rebirth.

We hope you take up the offer and that you enjoy your “trip” out of the house of incest into a new and more elevated world.

Tweetfest of Anais Nin’s House of Incest

Gemor edition of House of Incest

Gemor edition of House of Incest

As mentioned in the last post, to celebrate the upcoming publication of The Portable Anais Nin, we are tweeting Nin’s House of Incest, 140 characters at a time. Join us on Twitter to follow the enchanting words as they wind about one like dream filaments, each one standing alone as a stroke of unconscious genius, and all of them creating an epic work as they are woven together.

The House of Incest was originally published in 1936 by Siana (Anais spelled backwards) Editions in Paris as a small edition. Nin republished it in 1947 through her Gemor Press (named after Gonzalo More, her lover and collaborator), handset with engravings by Ian Hugo (pseudonym of Hugh Guiler, Nin’s husband), and once again by Swallow Press including photomontages by Val Telberg. Soon, it will be included in its entirety in The Portable Anais Nin. No matter the edition, Nin’s famous prose poem inspires the reader to plunge into the interior where creation begins.

Our Nin titles on Kindle are: Collages, The Winter of Artifice, Under a Glass Bell, Ladders to Fire, Children of the Albatross, A Spy in the House of Love, and Seduction of the Minotaur, and The Four-Chambered Heart, with more to follow.